• 06Feb

    Do either of you happen to know if there is any low lectin grains that I
    can still use for breads. Or said another way, breads I can purchase that
    are low lectin?

    Okay,
    Here’s a great article on lectins, what they are and how to avoid them.
    This guy encourages a low-lectin diet, by rotating small amounts that your
    body can take, in with mostly raw foods. (his idea)
    The way to destroy the lectins is to eat fermented and sprouted foods. So
    you can have your grains, as long as you sprout or ferment them – as in
    fermented barley.
    Since you’re probably WAY overwhelmed with stuff to do, you could start by
    buying Essene bread, or other sprouted breads. They’re good – not what
    you’re used to, but you can get, for example, sprouted english muffins to
    have warm garlic bread. I used to have it in the broiler with coconut oil
    and garlic powder. mmmm
    They have other sprouted bakery products, too, can’t remember them all. But
    go for those to start!
    You can also sprout just about any grain and make it into bread – don’t
    know if you want to do that yet. You basically soak the grain for a day,
    sprout it for a day, then grind and dehydrate it to make a flour.

  • 06Feb

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/lectins/#axzz1lcleKXVy

    an excellent article explaining the presence of lectins in our foods and how they stick like glue to our intestinal walls

    “They’re relatively sticky molecules, which makes them effective in binding with their sought after sugars but undesirable for our digestion, in which their binding powers can lead them to attach to the intestinal lining and wreak havoc…
    …Human ingenuity evolved across traditional cultures to “predigest” lectins through food preparation practices (fermenting, soaking, etc.).

    Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/lectins/#ixzz1lcmtuUkC

    “…the body reacts to these invaders by directing an attack on these particles and the otherwise perfectly healthy tissue they’re attached to. Enter autoimmune mayhem. That’s why lectins are linked with autoimmune disorders like IBS, Crohn’s, colitis, thyroiditis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and arthritis.”

    Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/lectins/#ixzz1lcnZM2Vv

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